The PIE User's Manual

Copyright (C) 1995 Metropolitan Human Services Commission. All rights reserved.

No part of this document may be copied or reproduced in any form or by any means without prior written consent of MHSC.

MHSC MAKES NO WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO THIS DOCUMENTATION AND DISCLAIMS ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. MHSC ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS THAT MAY APPEAR IN THIS DOCUMENT.

Chapter One: Introduction to PIE

The People and Information Exchange (PIE) is an on-line information system designed to serve the human services systems in Franklin County and Columbus. It was designed by the Metropolitan Human Services Commission to support the planning needs of its Board of Trustees and the major funding systems, service providers and other members of the Columbus and Franklin County community.

The PIE User's Manual

This User's Guide is provided to PIE users to introduce the PIE system, explain how to install and configure software to operate PIE, and describe basic PIE commands. The following is a description of its chapters:

Chapter 1 -- Introduction to PIE
Includes MHSC mission, PIE's purpose, features and hardware/software requirements.
Chapter 2 -- Getting Hooked Up on PIE
This chapter explains, in easy-to-understand language, how to use this manual and the disks provided to get started on PIE.
Chapter 3 -- Installing Kermit Software for Text-Based Mode
Describes the step-by-step method for DOS users to install PIE software on their system and find the correct hardware and software settings so that their computer can communicate with PIE.
Chapter 4 -- Installing Citrix Remote Link (RLINK) Software for Graphics-Based Mode
Describes the step-by-step method for Windows and OS/2 users to install PIE software on their system and find the correct hardware and software settings so that their computer can communicate with PIE.
Chapter 5 -- PIE Basics -- Text-Based Mode
Explains how text-based users use PIE, including moving around on the screens and saving, downloading and printing.
Chapter 6 -- PIE Basics -- Graphics-Based Mode
Explains how graphics-based users use PIE in graphics mode, including moving around on the screens and saving, downloading and printing.
Chapter 7 -- Future Updates
Describes methods for retrieving on-line updates of communications software, information about data updates and updates for this manual.

This User's Manual will continue to be updated and revised as often as necessary. This manual is also available on-line, and can be accessed via the menu system or on Netscape at PIE Documentation and Help.

The Metropolitan Human Services Commission (MHSC)

The Metropolitan Human Services Commission (MHSC) is a nonprofit agency established in 1977 to assist the Columbus and Franklin County community in planning and coordinating the provision of human services to its residents. The city, county and United Way fund the Commission, and each entity appoints six members to the MHSC Board of Trustees.

The mission of MHSC is to assist the Columbus and Franklin County community build and maintain a human services system that is responsive to changing needs and effective in achieving dignity, well-being and self-sufficiency for all residents.

The goal of MHSC is to institute quality community planning within the human services system that achieves the dignity, well-being and self-sufficiency of all residents in the Columbus and Franklin County community.

This goal will have been accomplished when the community continually:

  1. upholds a common vision of dignity, well-being and self-sufficiency,
  2. accepts responsibility for achieving that vision,
  3. provides resources and services which execute that responsibility; and,
  4. increases the gains made from the use of those resources and services.

MHSC fulfills its mission in a variety of ways. First of all, it educates and informs the community at large about the need for and value of human services, by communicating its message that "human services are for everyone." Secondly, MHSC develops, analyzes, maintains and disseminates relevant, current information on human services needs and services. Thirdly, MHSC staff work with planning and funding agencies to improve their abilities to plan individually and in coordination with one another. And, finally, MHSC monitors the human services system and reports to the community on progress that it has made in achieving dignity, well-being and self-sufficiency for all residents.

Over the years, our community has witnessed increasing demand, dwindling resources and shifting responsibility in the human services arena. For many human services providers, planning has necessarily become more demanding, more collaborative and more flexible. It is our hope that MHSC can continue to impact how these providers and the people whom they serve can improve the quality of life in the greater Columbus area.

Purpose of PIE

PIE is designed to help MHSC fulfill its mission. It will do this by improving the quality of information the MHSC staff and board have at their disposal as they formulate recommendations for the human services community. It also makes this information easily available to funders and providers of human services programs for use in their planning efforts.

How Does PIE Fulfill its Purpose?

PIE provides the computer capacity and quality-assurance oversight needed to build a shared pool of information about human services conditions, services and costs. The initial users of PIE will include the 15 funding systems in Franklin County and other agencies which provide human services. All 15 funders will contribute data about their agencies' programs, plans and expenditures. Much of this data is already available on PIE, and will continue to be updated regularly. These local funders can access this shared pool of information. PIE will offer the following services to the funders:

  1. Statistically-based information: census data, social indicators, funding data, service statistics;
  2. Local planning documents: current and historic copies of local plans and reports;
  3. Access to other local databases: crime data, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, etc.;
  4. Internet access: human services-related data from around the world using the Internet, a world-wide research and communications network;
  5. E-mail connections: the ability to send written messages to one another easily and almost instantaneously;
  6. Local information-sharing innovations: involving users in creating other tools, such as testing a United Way system for agencies to submit reporting forms electronically or establishing a discussion forum for the six settlement houses.

These possibilities are only the beginning. PIE's potential as a human services information system for Franklin County is only limited by the creativity of the organizations that contribute to it. MHSC is willing to explore any potential use of PIE that will improve community planning.

How Will PIE Help You?

PIE provides easy access to the MHSC information system. With a computer and a modem, you can access PIE from your home, office, or anywhere. A subscription to PIE allows you to:

Human services is a broad subject with a variety of specialties. PIE provides an opportunity for people with expertise in these specialties to share their knowledge in the hope of finding a better way to address human services needs. PIE is made available to the local human services community through the information and research function of the Metropolitan Human Services Commission.

PIE Features

PIE is the only electronic information system dedicated exclusively to the local health and human services community. PIE provides two major features: access to MHSC's information system and electronic communications with MHSC and other PIE users.

MHSC's Information System currently has the following databases available on PIE:

In addition, PIE offers the following networking/communications capabilities:

PIE Hardware and Software Requirements

You must have the following items to take advantage of PIE's features:

  1. PIE account, including login name, password and the PIE telephone number;
  2. disk containing communications software;
  3. analog telephone line;
  4. modem, any type and any speed;
  5. PIE User's Manual;
  6. personal computer, running DOS, Windows, or OS/2; newer versions of these operating systems will provide better performance.

These hardware and software components are the minimum required to get data and information from PIE, as well as to utilize the email and other networking capabilities.

Users of DOS 3.3, Windows 3.1 or newer or OS/2 2.0 or newer who also have:

  1. 9600 bps or faster modem
  2. video monitor/card that supports EGA, VGA, or SVGA graphics capability
  3. mouse
can use PIE's windows, colors and graphics. These last items are not necessary to operate PIE, but they enhance its ease of use and add the ability to see graphics on-line.

If you have any questions about the technical requirements, MHSC staff can assist you; please call 224-1336 or send email to admin@pie.mhsc.org.

Chapter Two: Getting Hooked Up on Pie

For you to access the information and services available over PIE, you will need to establish a connection between your computer and the PIE computer located at the Metropolitan Human Services Commission. This chapter provides simple instructions to do just that.

As you proceed through the steps below, you will need to know the answers to some questions about the hardware and software you are using. Often, these answers can be found in your system's manuals or set-up screens. Your local computer expert can also help you. If you are still stumped, contact the Information Services Division of MHSC at (614) 224-1336.

Once you have access to this information, you should fill out the "Troubleshooting and Questions" form that is included in your PIE User's Kit. This form will help MHSC staff assist you with future problems when you call our office.

  1. Lets start with your computer. Is your computer a stand-alone personal computer, or is it connected to a network of other computers? If your computer is connected to a network of other computers, STOP and talk with your network administrator. The administrator may want to contact MHSC to discuss the various ways of establishing a network connection and then advise you on how to proceed. If, instead, you have a stand-alone computer, or the network administrator tells you to proceed as though you did, read on.

  2. Next, do you have an analog phone line nearby? Here, too, you may need to talk with someone in your office to confirm that the line you plan to use is a standard analog telephone line and not a digital line. Later on, you will also need to know if you have to dial any prefix (like the number "9") to connect to an outside line.

  3. Do you have an external modem or an internal modem? Your computer connects up to the phone line through a modem. The modem translates electrical signals from your computer into a form that can travel over the telephone lines and vice versa. It may be built into your computer or sit nearby. If the modem is built into your computer, locate the built-in jack and connect the phone line using a standard modular connector. If it is external, you will need to connect the phone line to the modem and then run a serial cable from the modem to your computer. While we're on the topic of your modem, find out the answers to the following questions. You will need this information in future steps. You can find this information in your hardware manuals, invoices, system set-up screens or by consulting with your local computer expert.

  4. Although connecting your phone line, modem and computer together provides the physical path for your computer and PIE to talk to one another, they both need a translator to understand each other. With your registration packet you should have received a computer disk. You will need to load the communications program on this disk onto your computer. It is this program that translates communications between PIE and your computer. There are two versions of this disk. To make sure MHSC has provided you with the correct disk, decide which of the two statements below describes your computer capacity. You may need to consult with your local computer expert to verify some of the facts about your computer capacity.
    1. IF your computer is:
      • IBM-compatible,
      • with a 386 or faster microprocessor,
      • a monitor with EGA, VGA, or SVGA graphics capability,
      • using MS-DOS 3.3 or higher, or Windows 3.1 or higher, or OS/2 version 2.0 or higher,
      • with a mouse,
      • and a modem operating at 9600 bps or faster,
      THEN you will be operating PIE in "graphics-based" mode. The disk you received from MHSC should be titled: Citrix Remote Link (RLINK). Go to Chapter Four of this manual to continue.
    2. IF your computer:
      • is not IBM-compatible, or
      • has a 286 or slower microprocessor, or
      • has a less capable monitor such as CGA, or
      • older versions of MS-DOS, Windows, or OS/2, or
      • does not use a mouse, or
      • has a modem operating at 2400 bps or slower,
      THEN you will be operating PIE in "text-based" mode. The disk you received from MHSC should be titled: Kermit. Go to Chapter Three of this manual to continue.

Remember, if you need help as you proceed through these steps, contact the Information Services Division of MHSC at (614) 224-1336.

Chapter Three: Installing Kermit Software for Text-Based Mode

See section Chapter Two: Getting Hooked Up on Pie, before reading this chapter, for information about installation of software for your system. The answers to the questions in Chapter Two are required for the successful installation of PIE software.

This section is for PIE users who will be using text-based mode. This means that

  1. your computer is not IBM-compatible, or
  2. your computer is using a 286 or slower microprocessor, or
  3. you have a less capable monitor such as CGA, or
  4. you are using earlier versions of MS-DOS, Windows, or OS/2, or
  5. you do not use a mouse, or
  6. your modem operates at 2400 bps or slower.

This chapter will provide step-by-step instructions for installing the Kermit communications software. Installing Kermit may not be necessary if you already have an existing communications program that operates using a VT terminal and Kermit transfer protocol. Such programs include ProComm Plus, Crosstalk, Hyperaccess and others. See your users manual or your local computer guru for this information.

Installing Kermit Software for Text-Based Users

The Kermit application is a program that utilizes your computer's modem to communicate with PIE. You need to install Kermit onto your system. Depending on your operating system, you may need to configure Kermit to work with your computer settings and modem settings before actually being able to run it. To do this, you will need to know which operating system you are using (DOS, Windows or OS/2), know the type and speed of your modem, identify the communications (COM) Port where your modem is connected to your computer and have at least 2 megabytes of free disk space on your hard drive.

See section Kermit for OS/2 Users, if you are an OS/2 User. See section Kermit for DOS Users, if you use DOS.

Kermit for OS/2 Users

Users of OS/2 can install CKermit at either the DOS or OS/2 prompt (such as C:\). To do this, insert the disk provided and use the following instructions. CKermit's installation program will automatically ask you questions pertaining to your modem's type and speed during installation.

  1. Change the directory to your hard drive. For example, if your hard drive is drive C, then type C:. If you're already in drive C, then type:

    cd \
    

    Hit ENTER.

  2. Start the installation program that is on the disk by typing a:install and ENTER. The program will give the following prompts:

    Please enter the complete path where you want C-Kermit to be installed.
    Just press the Enter key to accept the default path, C:\CKERMIT\...
    

    Hit the ENTER key if you want to keep C:\CKERMIT as the directory for Kermit. If not, type in the directory (i.e., drive and path) where you would like Kermit installed and type ENTER. After hitting the ENTER key, another message will appear on the screen:

    You have asked that C-Kermit be installed in C:\CKERMIT\.
    Is this correct? (Yes/No):
    

    This message will be different if you changed the directory name. Make sure the directory is correct and type yes. After answering yes, more messages will appear:

    Creating destination directory C:\CKERMIT\...
    
    C-Kermit is designed to work with many different brands of modems.
    Please choose your preferred modem type from the following list:
    
     attdtdm            attisn             attmodem           att7300
     ccitt-v25bis       cermetek           concord            courier
     df03-ac            df100-series       df200-series       digitel-dt22
     gdc-212a/ed        hayes              microcom           none
     penril             pep-telebit        racalvadic         rolm
     slow-telebit       sportster          telebit            unknown
     usrobotics-212a    v32-telebit        v42-telebit        ventel
    
    Pressing the Enter key by itself selects HAYES...
    

    Type the name of your modem if it appears on the list, or type the name that best fits your type of modem. If your modem name does not appear on the list, try using Hayes or just typing ENTER. The program will verify your answer. Just type yes if it is correct. [If you do not know your modem's type, check your Modem User's Manual, ask your local computer guru or contact MHSC by email (admin@pie.mhsc.org) or by phone (224-1336)].

    The program will then ask you to choose the communications (COM) port where your modem is connected. Most computers use the ISA and EISA options (COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4). If you do not know where your modem is located, you need to find out by checking the back of your computer or your operating system manual. Call MHSC if you need further assistance.

    The installation program will again verify your answer.

    The program will ask for your modem's speed, in bits per second (bps). If you know the bps rate, type it in. [If you do not know your modem's speed, check your Modem User's Manual, ask your local computer guru or contact MHSC by email (admin@pie.mhsc.org) or by phone (224-1336.]

    The installation program will again verify your answer.

    Finally, the program will ask you to choose the type of session in which Kermit will operate. As an OS/2 User, you should be familiar with the differences between these two choices, so just choose one of them or type ENTER. The program will verify your answer. The installation program above creates the C:\Kermit directory on your hard drive and copies the required files there. All you need to do is be patient for a few minutes as this process continues.

  3. When the installation is completed, the screen will show the following messages:

    Installation is now complete, to start Kermit, change the default
    directory to the Kermit directory and execute one of the following
    commands:
    
    FULL.CMD -- Kermit for Full-Screen Sessions
    
    CKERMIT.CMD -- Kermit for Windowed Sessions (OS/2)
    
    
    See the `README.DOC' file for recent updates and information.
    

  4. At the bottom of the screen there should be a command prompt (C:\Kermit>). To run one of the above programs, type the name of that program at this prompt. For example, if you want to run Kermit in a DOS session, which is always full-screen, then type ckermit. The CKERMIT> prompt will appear after some messages on the screen that you can ignore. See section Getting into PIE, for instructions for using this software to start PIE.

Kermit for DOS Users

To install Kermit at a DOS prompt (such as C:\), insert the disk provided and use the following instructions.

  1. Change the directory to your hard drive. For example, if your hard drive is drive C, then type C:. If you're already in drive C, then type:

    cd \
    

    Hit ENTER.

  2. Create a new directory on your hard drive by typing the command mkdir and the name of the new directory. For example:

    mkdir kermit
    

    If successful, you will be returned to the C:\ prompt, and the new directory, C:\KERMIT will be created but will not yet appear on the screen.

  3. Copy the Kermit files from the floppy disk (A:) to the new C:\KERMIT directory by typing the following command line:

    xcopy A:\*.* C:\KERMIT /s
    

    Hit ENTER. DOS will copy the Kermit files to your new C:\KERMIT drive.

  4. Now you need to edit the configuration file that comes with Kermit. This file controls Kermit's settings so it knows what type of system you have as well as how fast your modem is. To edit this file, you need to know how to use a DOS editor of some kind. Try the command EDIT as it is used below if you do not know what editors exist on your system. Follow these steps to edit the file:

    1. Change to the C:\Kermit directory by typing:

      cd kermit
      

      Hit ENTER.

    2. Open the file `MSCUSTOM.INI' using your text editor by typing the following:

      edit mscustom.ini
      

    3. Move to the end of the file using PG DOWN.

    4. Find the line that begins with set port and change the "1" to whatever communications (COM) port your modem is set on (i.e. 1, 2, 3 or 4).

    5. Find the line that begins set speed and change "9600" to the Kermit setting for your modem's speed (bps rate). Use the following table for conversion of your modem's designated speed to what you should set in the Kermit file:
      Modem:
      Kermit:
      1200 baud
      1200
      2400 baud
      2400
      9600 bps
      9600
      14400 bps
      38400
      If your modem has a higher speed than 14400 bps, the 38400 setting on this line will work. All modems are different. If the setting above does not work, try changing it to a lower setting.

    6. If your modem is set for its own flow control, then find the line that begins set flow control and change xon/xoff to RTS/CTS. If your modem is not set for flow control, or if you do not know if it is, then leave this line as it appears. If PIE doesn't work on the first try, you can change xon/xoff to RTS/CTS and try it again.

    7. Save the file using the Save command, not Save As. (If you are in a word processor such as WordPerfect, you will need to save the file as a DOS text file or it will not work.) If you are using the DOS Editor, type the following:

      ALT (the ALT key) f s [no spaces, just letters]
      

      Once the file has been saved, you can exit the editor by typing:

      ALT f x [no spaces]
      

  5. Change to the C:\Kermit directory by typing:

    cd kermit
    

    Hit ENTER. You should get the C:\KERMIT> prompt. Type kermit at this prompt, and the program will begin running.

Setting up Kermit can be somewhat complicated. If you follow the above steps, you should have little trouble. There is, however, always the risk of typing and syntax errors. If it does not work the first time, try again. If, after a second and maybe a third attempt, it still does not run, call MHSC staff for assistance at 224-1336. We can best help you if you know the type of computer, operating software and type and speed of your modem; a form to fill out with this information is contained in your PIE User's Kit. If you do not have this information, however, we can help you find it. Also, it is often helpful if you keep track of any messages the computer gives you.

Connecting to PIE

This section is for people who are using text-based mode and wish to connect to PIE. If you are trying to connect to PIE in graphics-based mode, See section Connecting to PIE. For more information about text and graphics-based modes in PIE, See section Chapter Two: Getting Hooked Up on Pie.

When you run Kermit, you will see an addition to your regular prompt:

C:\KERMIT> C-Kermit>  (OS/2 Users)

or

C:\KERMIT> Kermit>  (DOS Users)

At this point, type dial and the phone number for PIE's text-based mode (t224-4264 or t9w224-4264 if you have to dial the prefix "9" first). A connection will be made, and then the Kermit prompt will appear again, with the message that says in order to connect, you need to type connect. (Note: If you are using a phone line the requires a prefix, such as "9," to get an outside line, use the prefix and the letter "t" (for "tone dial") and the letter "w" (for "wait for dial tone") before the number, like this: t9w224-4264.

When you type connect, Kermit will connect to PIE, and the PIE prompt will appear asking for your login name. See section Getting Around on PIE, for more information about how to use PIE from this point.

Exiting Kermit

To exit Kermit, you need to be in the main menu called "Welcome to PIE!" Select "Log off" by typing a 3 and ENTER. Kermit will close the connection and take you back to the DOS or OS/2 prompt at which you started the session.

Chapter Four: Installing Citrix Software for Graphics-Based Mode

Before reading this chapter, See section Chapter Two: Getting Hooked Up on Pie, for information about installation of software for your system. The answers to the questions in Chapter Two are required for the successful installation of PIE software.

This section is for users in PIE's graphics-based mode. You can use graphics-based mode if

  1. your computer is IBM-compatible,
  2. it has a 386 or faster microprocessor,
  3. it has a monitor with EGA, VGA, or SVGA graphics capability,
  4. it uses MS-DOS 3.3 or higher, or Windows 3.1 or higher, or OS/2 version 2.0 or higher,
  5. it has a mouse,
  6. and it has a modem operating at 9600 bps or faster.

The Citrix Remote Link (RLINK) application is a program that utilizes your computer's modem to communicate with PIE at high speeds so that color graphics and the mouse can be used. You need to install RLINK and configure it to talk to your particular type of modem. This chapter will provide step-by-step instructions to install the RLINK software. You will need to know the type and speed of your modem and you will need to have at least 2 megabytes of free disk space on your hard drive to install RLINK.

Installing RLINK Software for Graphics-Based Users

To install RLINK, at a DOS prompt (such as C:\) insert the disk provided and follow these instructions exactly, step-by-step:

  1. Change the directory to your hard drive. For example, if your hard drive is drive C, then type C:. If you're already in drive C, then type cd \ and ENTER.
  2. Start the installation program that is on the disk by typing a:install and ENTER. The program will ask you the following questions. Most likely it will work fine if you just hit ENTER after each question; this will select the answer in brackets, which is called the default.
    ? Where do you want RLINK installed? [C:\RLINK]
    If C is where your hard drive is located, then this default is okay and you can hit ENTER. If you have your hard drive represented by another letter, replace the C with that letter by typing X:\RLINK, where X is the letter of your hard drive.
    ? Do you wish to change any install options? [N]
    If you know of particular options that you would like to change, then make those changes here. Most users will not learn about these changes until they have tried the default settings and found them unsatisfactory. In other words, you can just hit ENTER at this question unless you have done this before.
    The installation program creates the C:\RLINK directory on your hard drive and copies the required files there. All you need to do is be patient for a few minutes as this process continues.
  3. When the installation is completed, the screen will show you the following messages:

    Installation is now complete, to start Remote Link, change the default
    directory to the Remote Link directory and execute one of the following
    commands:
    
    RLINK.EXE -- Remote Link for DOS
    
    TEXTLINK.EXE -- Remote Link for DOS (text only)
    
    RLINK2.EXE -- Remote Link for OS/2 (text only)
    
    
    See README.DOC file for recent updates and information.
    

    At the bottom of the screen there should be a DOS prompt (C:\RLINK>). To run one of the above programs, type the name of that program at this prompt. For example, if you want to run Remote Link for DOS, which is the full version that includes graphics capability, then type RLINK. The Main Menu for that version of Remote Link will appear.

You are now ready to set up Remote Link.

Setting Up Remote Link

At the Citrix Remote Link (RLINK) Main Menu, use the following instructions to tell the software what type of modem you are using and where it can find it.

  1. Go to AppServer List by typing S.
  2. Type F10 for Actions.
  3. Type A for Add.
  4. Fill in the information required, using the following guidelines:
    Label [ ]
    Type in your own label for PIE.
    Description [ ]
    Type in you own short description (3 or 4 words) of PIE.
    Phone [ ]
    Type in 224-4263, the phone number for PIE (found in the PIE Packet). If you are using a phone line that requires a prefix to dial out, such as a "9," then add that prefix with the number and the letter "w" to the phone number, like this: 9w224-4263.
    Loginname [ ]
    Leave this item blank. You will be prompted to type your loginname when you connect to PIE.
    Password [ ]
    Same as Loginname above. You will be prompted to type in your password after you type in your loginname.
    User Program [ ]
    Leave this blank.
    Work Directory [ ]
    Leave this blank.
    Connection Type [ASYNC]
    Leave it set at ASYNC.
    Emulation Mode [ICA]
    Leave it set at ICA.
    Modem Type [Direct Connect (no modem)]
    Hit ENTER to see a list of modems. Choose the one that best matches your model. If you can't find your model in the list, use the Hayes model that fits your modem's speed (bps rate) or choose Generic Modem. If your modem is not on the list, make sure that the Baud Rate, Flow Control and Error Correction settings below are compatible with your modem.
    Device Name [COM1 ]
    Choose the communications (COM) Port to which your modem is connected. Hit ENTER to see a list of choices.
    Baud Rate [19200 ]
    This should already be selected by the Modem Type that you chose above.
    Device Parameters [NONE,8,1]
    Leave set at NONE,8,1
    Flow Control [RTS/CTS ]
    This should already be selected by the Modem Type that you chose above.
    Error Correction (X) YES ( ) NO
    If your modem supports error correction, then set this option to NO by moving to the word "NO" and hitting the SPACE BAR, this will allow the modem to do error correction. If your modem does not support error correction, set this option to YES. This item is NOT set by your Modem Type choices above.
    Compression (X) YES ( ) NO
    If your modem supports compression, set this option to NO as above. If your modem does not support compression, set this option to YES. This item is NOT set by your Modem Type choices above.
    Script File [ ]
    Leave this blank.
    Here is an example of how these settings might be set. Use these as a guideline only.
    
    LABEL: [The People and Information Exchange]
    DESCRIPTION: [On-line information system -- MHSC]
    PHONE: [614-224-4263]
    LOGINNAME: [LEFT BLANK   ]
    PASSWORD: [LEFT BLANK      ]
    USER PROGRAM: [LEFT BLANK   ]
    WORK DIRECTORY: [LEFT BLANK   ]
    CONNECTION TYPE: [ASYNC]
    EMULATION MODE: [ICA]
    MODEM TYPE: [ZOOM 14400 v32bis FaxModem]
    DEVICE NAME: [COM2]
    BAUD RATE: [19200]
    DEVICE PARAMETERS: [NONE,8,1]
    FLOW CONTROL: [RTS/CTS]
    ERROR CORRECTION: ( ) YES    (X) NO
    COMPRESSION: ( ) YES    (X) NO
    SCRIPT FILE: [LEFT BLANK    ]
    
    F1=Help F2=Save F3=Exit F4=Save & Exit F6=List F7=Advanced
    
    Note that the above are only examples. Each modem and each computer will have different settings.
  5. When you are finished with these settings, hit F4 to Save and Exit the settings screen. Then hit ESC to return to the Main Menu.

The other options on your screen do not need to be modified now but they may meet further needs at a later time. For now, explore and use them at your own risk.

If a DOS prompt appears on the screen because you accidentally hit O for OS/2 Command Prompt, just type exit at the prompt and you will return to the Main Menu.

At this point you should see the Remote Link Main Menu screen. You are now finished with the install diskette and can remove it from the drive and put it back in the PIE Kit for future reference. The next section describes how to connect to PIE.

Connecting to PIE

At the Main Menu type D for Dial/Connect to Server. Hit ENTER to choose PIE. A Dialing Status box will appear and the codes being sent to your modem will be displayed below it. Wait a minute or two, and the connection will be made. See section Getting into PIE, for information about getting on PIE after making the connection.

Exiting RLINK

When you are ready to exit Remote Link, disconnect from PIE and type x at the RLINK Main Menu. (See section Getting Around on PIE, for information about disconnecting). A Warning Box will appear. Hit ENTER and you will return to DOS.

Chapter Five: PIE Basics -- Text-Based Mode

This chapter is for PIE users who are in text-based mode and have installed the Kermit communications software or its equivalent.

See section Chapter Six: PIE Basics -- Graphics-Based Mode, if you are using graphics-based mode and have installed Citrix Remote Link (RLINK).

Getting into PIE

Getting into PIE in text-based mode is as easy as...well...pie. The only difference between text-based mode and graphics-based mode is that you will see text all the time while you're on PIE, while graphics-based users will see icons (i.e., pictures with words that describe functions).

After using Kermit software to connect to PIE, the Login: and Password: prompts will appear. Type your loginname and password (as provided in the PIE Packet). Your screen will exhibit the Welcome to PIE! screen and menu as shown below.

                                Welcome to PIE!


           Copyright (C) 1995 Metropolitan Human Services Commission.
                              All rights reserved.

                  1. Electronic mail
                  2. Access MHSC's databases and the Internet
                  3. Log off


Enter selection:

To access MHSC's data on PIE, type the number 2 (Access MHSC's Databases and the Internet) and hit ENTER to access MHSC data on PIE.

Getting Around on PIE

Once in PIE you have several options for getting around in the menus. First of all, you can see some of these options at the bottom of every screen. Secondly, you can type the ? (Shft-/) and get a list of additional keys that you can use.

The following is a list of commonly used keys and their functions while in text-based PIE.

q
This key quits PIE and takes you back to your desktop computer. It will verify your request to quit with the question: Really quit? (y/n). Just type y and ENTER to exit PIE.
SPACE
This key moves you down the page that's currently on the screen. It's used in reading documents that fill up more than one screen at a time. This key does the same thing as the PAGE DOWN key.
ENTER
The ENTER key "enters" the selected menu item (the one being pointed at or that the cursor is on when you hit it). Depending on the item, you may get another menu of selections, a document or some other prompt. The RIGHT arrow key works the same as ENTER.
u
Use this key to move to the last item that you were viewing. For example, hit u when you've finished looking at a document or a menu and want to return to the place where you found that item. The LEFT arrow has the same effect.
UP
The UP arrow moves the cursor or selecting arrow up the list if you are looking at a menu, or it will move you to the last item on that page if you are already at the top of the menu list. If you are in a document, this key moves you up one page at a time to the top of that document (which is the same as PAGE UP).
PAGE DOWN
Use the PAGE DOWN key to move down one screen. When in a menu, this key moves you to the next screen of the menu if there's more than one screenful. When in a document, this key moves you down one screen in that document. The SPACE BAR usually has the same effect, and the DOWN arrow has the same effect in documents.
PAGE UP
This key is exactly the opposite of the PAGE DOWN key. It moves you up one screen in either the menu or the document you are viewing. The UP arrow has the same effect in documents as this key.
0, 1, 2, 3... (any number on the menu)
If you are looking at a menu, type any number on the menu and you will go to that item. This includes numbers that you cannot see on the screen, but that are included in the next pages of the menu. When you type a number, a prompt will appear at the bottom of the screen with the number you typed. Hit ENTER to go to the item with that number without viewing its name on the menu.
m
This key has several functions, depending on what you are looking at. If you're viewing a menu, it takes you back to the main menu, often referred to as "home." In a document, it allows you to email the document to yourself or a colleague. To do this, type m while in a document and a prompt will appear asking for an email address. Type in your address or that of the person to whom you would like to send the document and hit ENTER. The host will send the whole document via email. See section Email.
s
Save the current text file. This will save the current file that you are viewing to your PIE directory. To view this saved file, you will need to use PINE by typing pine at the PIE prompt. See Pine's on-line help for further information.
Ctrl-G
This keystroke is often designated as ^G on PIE and other hosts. Use it when you want to cancel a particular operation. For example, when you are about to connect to another host, a dialog box often appears and asks if you REALLY want to leave PIE and connect to another host. At that point, it will give you the option of hitting ^G to cancel and return to where you were.

These keys may vary depending on the host to which you are connected. Usually you can hit the ? and get help for that host. If that doesn't work, be sure to check the bottom of the screen for instructions on how to get help.

Another useful convention in Gopher is the use of symbols to represent certain types of links. The following table shows the most common symbols:

Gopher objects:
Item tag    Type      Description
--------------------------------------------
(none)        0       file
/             1       directory
<)            s       sound file
<Bin>         9       binary file
<PC Bin>      5       DOS binary file
<CSO>         2       CSO (ph/qi) phone-book server
<TEL>         8       telnet connection
<3270>        T       telnet connection (IBM 3270 emulation)
<MIME>        M       Multi-purpose Internet Mail Extensions file
<HTML>        h       HyperText Markup Language file
<?>           7       index-search item
<??>        (none)    ASK form

These symbols appear at the end of each item in a menu(1). Some of these symbols, such as <TEL>, will prompt you with a query box before executing the item.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks mark your place, just like when you are reading a book. If you want to save your place so you can come back to it later, use the following commands.

a
Add -- Type a to save your current place in PIE. Make sure you are viewing the appropriate item that you want to be able to see again. If you are viewing a document, for instance, and you want to be able to see that document AND the others related to it at the same place, then you will need to go back one screen and type a so that you can view that document and the others related to it. When you type a, a query box will appear and ask you what you want to name the bookmark. You can use the suggested name, or create your own. Whatever you enter in this box will show up on your Bookmark list when you view it.
v
View -- Type v whenever you want to view the items in your bookmark file. This key will take you to a menu listing of all those files that you have added using a to your Bookmark List. You can use v at any menu.
d
Delete -- Use the d key to delete an item from your Bookmark List. To use this key, go to your Bookmark List (v), move to the item you want to delete, and hit d. PIE will not verify your selection, so be careful. Also, note that d has a different function in other parts of PIE, so make sure you are in your Bookmark List if you are using it here.

Email Functions in Text-Based Mode

Email

Electronic mail (Email) is a useful function on PIE for communicating with others who have PIE accounts as well as colleagues who have accounts on other systems (i.e., CompuServe, Freenets, and other Internet hosts). There are various editors available for viewing email, and MHSC has chosen one that is both easy to learn and has an adequate number of functions.

This section of the manual will not tell you everything there is to know about PIE's email/text editor. It will give you the help needed to do basic email functions: read, send, save, reply to and forward messages.

The text editor being used to read email for text-based users is called PINE. PINE comes with its own help documentation on-line. To access this documentation, simply type the ? once you get into PINE.

To start PINE, go to the PIE Main Menu and move to the item that says Email and hit ENTER.

The following functions and keys will help you use PINE's basic email functions. Type ? for more information about advanced functions in the the PINE help documentation.

Email Addresses
To use email you need to know what an email address is. Email addresses tell the computer host (e.g. PIE) where to send your messages. Addresses have two parts, separated by the @ sign. The part before the @ is the mailbox, which is, roughly speaking, your personal name. The part after the @ is called the domain, which is the name of the computer you are using (e.g., PIE). Your email address is your username (i.e., the name you use to login), plus the domain name for PIE, which is pie.mhsc.org. It is written:
username@pie.mhsc.org
If another PIE user is writing to you, or if you are sending a message to another PIE user, then you only need to use the username, because you are both at the same domain. When you send messages to people who are not PIE users, you will need to know their full email address. Some usernames are clearly related to the person's actual name, but some have no relation whatsoever. CompuServe, for example, uses an arbitrarily assigned number as the username for each person. Therefore, most CompuServe addresses look like this:
12345.6789@compuserve.com
For further information about usernames and domain names, send an email message to admin@pie.mhsc.org, or check out any of the several books available in the library about the Internet.(2)
Compose Messages
To mail a message to someone, you need to do what PINE calls Compose. From PINE's main menu (not PIE's), type c. An editor screen will appear, with an email header at the top. The first part of this header is the address (To :). Type in the address for the person to whom you are sending a message. (See Addresses below for more information.) Use the CC : line for those people to whom you would like to "copy" the message. Ignore the Attachment : line for now. Use the Subject: line for the subject of your message. While PINE does not require a subject, it is important for you to use one. See the section about viewing email below for further understanding of the importance of subjects. After entering all of these lines as needed, the -----Message Text----- line is highlighted, and the cursor moves to the first blank line of the screen. Type your message here. Be sure to end the message with some kind of line that tells the receiver who you are and how to reach you via email. Some mail applications don't give this information completely when the mail is sent. When you are finished with the message, type Ctrl-x (^X) to send it. You are done composing, and there should be a prompt at the bottom of the screen that asks Send message? (y). Answer y or just hit ENTER.
View Messages
You can view messages that have been sent to you easily in PINE. From the PINE Main Menu hit I, for Folder Index. This will create a list (index) of all the messages in your current folder, which is called the Inbox folder. Your Inbox is the mailbox on PIE to which all your new messages are sent. Once the index for your Inbox is listed, you can read any message by simply moving to that message using the arrow keys and hitting ENTER. The message text will appear, along with the message headers that tell you where the message originated and the subject of the message. You will find subjects very important when you start receiving a lot of mail because they make it easy to sort through the mail and delete unwanted messages without having to view them.
Reply to Message being Viewed
To reply to the message that you are viewing, simply type r. This will bring up a question:
Include original message in reply? (y/n/^C) [n]
If you want the receiver to see the message that he or she sent to you, then type y. If not, then just hit ENTER. An editing screen will appear. Type your reply, and hit Ctrl-x to send it.
Deleting and Saving Messages
Delete a message in your mailbox by simply pressing d while a message in the index is highlighted. A "D" will appear next to the message. You can "tag" as many messages for deletion as you wish. When you exit PINE, it will ask if you want to expunge the deleted messages. This means that you will eliminate these messages from your mailbox, never to be seen again. You can do this even if you haven't read the messages. If you want to delete the messages, simply answer y to the question and PINE will delete them. You can also save messages. One way to save a message is to leave it in your Inbox folder. It will appear again if you haven't deleted it. Another way to save messages is by creating another folder and saving them to that folder. To do this, type s, and a folder query will appear. Type in a name for the new folder (make it something that you'll remember later) and hit ENTER. It will ask if you want to create the folder (assuming it doesn't already exist). Answer y. PINE will create the folder and save that message there. To view messages in a folder other than your Inbox, go to the PINE Main Menu, type L, and a list of all your email folders appears. Select one by moving the cursor with the arrow keys and hit ENTER. An index for that folder will appear, and you can use it as you would your Inbox folder. Please note that each message in each folder takes up space on PIE, which is limited. Use delete and save often, and check your extra folders for unneeded messages periodically.

These are the basic PINE functions for using email. If you want to know about advanced functions, see the on-line help in PINE.

Saving and Printing from PIE in Text-Based Mode

Saving

Saving in PIE is the same as saving on your computer at the office or at home. Saving records the file that you are viewing on a disk, but in this case, that disk is in PIE. Because PIE is a totally separate computer system from your own computer, it has its own operating system (UNIX) and its own directories and filename conventions.

You can only save files to the PIE directory. View the document you want to save and then type s to save it. A query box will appear asking you what to name the file. These filenames are not limited to 8 characters and a 3-letter extension. You can have several characters and as many periods as you want. Do not make the filename overly complex, however. In the future you may need to search for one file, and it is much more difficult to find files with long filenames.

Once a file is saved, you can do several things. You can use a process called File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to transfer that file from PIE's directory to your computer's hard drive or a floppy disk. You can start email or some other text editor on PIE and view the file at your home PC. Or you can send the file to someone using email. More information on these functions will be distributed as needed. Call MHSC for more information.

Printing

If your computer is properly connected to a printer, you can print documents using the communications software (i.e., Kermit). Type ALT-p at the screen you wish to have printed. The screen will be printed on your printer according to the configuration of your printer and your computer. Unfortunately, this is the only way that documents can be printed in text-based mode at this time. Future versions of PIE will include other options for printing.

Chapter Six: PIE Basics -- Graphics-Based Mode

This chapter is for PIE users who are in graphics-based mode and have installed the Citrix Remote Link (RLINK) software. People using text-based mode who have installed Kermit should See section Chapter Five: PIE Basics -- Text-Based Mode.

If your computer is not running with the above capabilities, then you should be using the text-based mode for accessing and getting around in PIE. See section Chapter Two: Getting Hooked Up on Pie, for more information about PIE's modes and their differences.

Getting into PIE

Getting into PIE in graphics-based mode is as easy as...well...pie. The only difference between text-based mode and graphics-based mode is that in text-based mode you will see text all the time while you're on PIE, while graphics-based users will see icons (i.e., pictures with words that describe functions).

After using RLINK to connect to PIE, your screen will exhibit the PIE Folder Window. This window shows you the PIE Folder, a collection of icons (little pictures) that will run the named programs when you double-click on them with the mouse. Some of the programs will be used for accessing data, and others will be for other PIE functions like email and newsgroups. Not all of these programs are explained in this first version of the manual.

To get into PIE, double-click on the icon named "PIE." The screen will blink and the Home Page for PIE will appear in a window, with a menu line at the top and several function buttons in color under it. You are now in the PIE Home Page, where you will find PIE documentation and MHSC's human services planning and funding information.

Getting Around on PIE

The following is a list of functions and the methods to execute them while in graphics mode. Many of these functions use the mouse and conventional descriptions of mouse manipulation (i.e., drag and drop, point and click, etc.). See your operating system manual for the definition of these mouse terms if you do not already know them.

Exiting PIE
To exit PIE while using Gopher or Netscape, click on File, Exit. The application will prompt you to verify that you want to quit. You can also double-click in the top left corner of the Windows PIE screen to close the Window.
Moving Up and Down Pages
Use the side bar (with the arrows at the top and bottom) to move up and down the page you are currently viewing. Point and click on the up arrow to move up the page, and point and click on the down arrow to move down. You can also drag and drop the button-like part of the bar up or down the bar to move the text faster.
Click to Enter Item
To enter or move to a particular highlighted item in the current document you are viewing (such as the name of a database), point at the highlighted area (the cursor pointer will change) and click the mouse. The window screen will blink and the new item will appear.
Move Backward a Screen
When you have finished viewing a document or menu and you want to go back to the previous item, simply point and click at the "Back" button at the top of the window you are viewing. Please note that this will not necessarily take you to the screen that lists the current document. This is important to note when doing quicklist entries and opening URL documents. (See Load a Different URL and Bookmarks (Quicklists) below.)
Save a Document
If you are viewing a text document, you can save that document directly to your local hard drive (drive C:). Click on File, then Save As. The source document for the item you are viewing will be named in the "File Name" area. To save a document, click on the arrow next to the "Save File as Type" box at the bottom of the window. When the list of File Types appears, click on All Files. Then go back up to the "File Name" box, click inside it, delete the current filename and replace it with one of your own choosing, using the conventions of your computer (usually 8 characters, a period, and 3 characters, maximum). Then hit ENTER. Saving is only used for documents that you can already see on the screen, like text files.
Mail a Document
While viewing a document, you can click on File, Mail Document, and a prompt will appear asking you for someone's email address. If you have not specified a valid email address for yourself in the Preferences section of Netscape, you need to do that first. Click on Options (in the top menu), Preferences. Click the arrow next to the box at the top of the window. When the list appears, click on "Mail and Proxies." In the "Mail" box, click in the white space next to "Your Name:" and type in your name. Click in the "Your Email:" box and type your email address. See section Email, for more information about email addresses. If you want to send the currently viewed document to someone, type in his/her address, click on "Include document text" and hit ENTER. The host will send the whole document on email. If you want to send a message with the document, type your message in the space provided before sending it.
Load a Different URL Document
If you know the URL (Universal Resource Locator) of a document on the Internet, you can access that document using Netscape. The URL tells Netscape where to look for the particular server file you want. It acts as the address for that server. Click on File, Open Location, click inside the white box, and type the URL, then hit ENTER. Make sure the URL includes the type of URL, such as http or gopher. URLs are in the following form:

http://www.internic.net/welcome.html  (HTML and World Wide Web)

gopher://pie.mhsc.org  (Gopher)

ftp://nic.nsf.net/subdirectory/filename  (FTP)

telnet://freenet.columbus.oh.us  (Telnet)

The ftp and telnet functions often require additional knowledge of the host site to which you are connecting. See the help documentation at that site for further information (usually found in some sort of file named README.

Halt Loading a URL
Use this when you want to cancel loading a particular URL document. Click on the STOP button at the top of the screen. Some URL locations can take time to load due to large graphics files and other complicated files that are a part of the site. If you have to wait, usually the image that you get when it finally loads is worth it. You can use the Options settings in Netscape to disable the loading of graphics if you wish. Simply go to OPTIONS and uncheck the "Auto Loading Graphics" option and that function will be disabled. Then, to see graphics, you will have to click on their icons that appear on the screen in their place.
Bookmarks (Quicklist)
Bookmarks save your place, just as if you were reading a book. To save the current place so that you can come back to it later, click on the word Bookmarks at the top of the screen. Then click on Add Bookmarks. The file you are currently viewing (actually, its URL) is saved on your Bookmarks list. To see your bookmarks list, click on Bookmarks and the list will appear under Add Bookmarks and View Bookmarks. Click on any of the URLs in the list and Netscape will take you to that URL. To delete items from this list, click on Bookmarks, View Bookmarks, Edit. Point and click on the URL you want to remove, and click on remove.

Email Functions in Graphics-Based Mode

Electronic mail (Email) is a useful function on PIE for communicating with others who have PIE accounts as well as colleagues who have accounts on other systems (i.e., CompuServe, Freenets, and other Internet hosts). There are various editors available for viewing email, and MHSC has chosen one that is both easy to learn and has an adequate number of functions.

This section of the manual will not tell you everything there is to know about PIE's email application. It will give you the help needed to do basic email functions: read, send, save, reply to and forward messages.

When the PIE window comes up (it should be the first thing you see after the Windows 3.1 logo screen), double-click on the icon that says Email. This will run the Email application. At least one Window called "IN" will appear. This is your Inbox, where all of your incoming messages will be stored. The Inbox is updated regularly by the email software.

The following instructions will help you in using Email functions:

Email Addresses
To use email you need to know what an email address is. Email addresses tell the computer host (e.g., PIE) where to send your messages. Addresses have two parts, separated by the @ sign. The part before the @ is the mailbox, which is, roughly speaking, your personal name. The part after the @ is called the domain, which is the name of the computer you are using (e.g., PIE). Your email address is your username (i.e., the name you use to login), plus the domain name for PIE, which is pie.mhsc.org. It is written:
username@pie.mhsc.org
If another PIE user is writing to you, or if you are sending a message to another PIE user, then you only need to use the username, because you are both at the same domain. When you send messages to people who are not PIE users, you will need to know their full email address. Some usernames are well-related to the person's actual name, some have no relation whatsoever. CompuServe, for example, uses an arbitrarily assigned number as the username for each person. Therefore, most CompuServe addresses look like this:
12345.6789@compuserve.com
For further information about usernames and domain names, send an email message to admin@pie.mhsc.org, or check out any of the several books available in the library about the Internet.(3)
Reading Messages
To read a message from your Inbox, simply double-click on that message, or highlight it using the arrow keys and hit ENTER. The message will appear in a separate window, with a header telling you who sent the message and what the subject is.
Sending Messages
To send a message, click on the word "Message" at the top of your Email window. Then click on New Message. A separate window will appear. Click on the "TO:" line and type in the address of the person you want to send the message to. Click on the subject line or use the TAB key until you are on the subject line, and type in a subject. Click in the area below the gray line, or tab to the area, and type in your message. Be sure to include your name and email address at the end of your message. Some email applications do not include this information with their messages. When you are finished typing the message, click on the word SEND, and your message will be sent. To test your sending function, send an email message to the PIE administrator at admin@pie.mhsc.org. He will reply to your message within a day so you will know your email is working.
Replying to Messages
While in your Inbox with the message you are replying to highlighted, click on the Reply Button or click on Messages, Reply. A new window will appear, with the message you are replying to copied and each line of it starting with a >. Type your reply, and click on the word SEND.
Forwarding Messages
To forward messages, follow the same procedure as that in Replying above, but use the word "Forward" instead of "Reply."
Deleting Messages
To delete messages, highlight the message you want to delete by clicking on it or using the arrow keys. Click on the Trash button in that window (it has a red arrow pointing to a trash can). The message will be deleted. To delete more than one message at a time, point to the first message, hold down the mouse button and drag the mouse down to the last message that you want deleted. This will highlight all messages between the first and the last that you point to. Then use the Trash button to delete all of them at once. Be careful when deleting messages. They are not recoverable.
Cancelling a Message
To cancel a message before it is sent or replied to, simple click on the top, left-hand corner square of the window that the message is in, and it will close, cancelling the message.
Saving Email
Saving email is useful if you want to keep a message but you do not want it to show up in your Inbox every time you open email. Highlight the message you want to save. Click on Transfer, New, and a prompt will appear asking you for the name of your new box. Type in a name (8 characters or less). Hit ENTER or click on OK. The box will be created, and the highlighted message will be transferred to that box. To see the messages in the box, click on Mailbox, and the name of the mailbox you want to see. That mailbox will appear in its own window, and you can perform the functions above on any of the messages that appear there, including transferring to other boxes.
Exiting Email
To exit Email, click on File, Exit; or double-click the top, left-hand square in the window and it will close the application.

Saving, Downloading, Uploading and Printing in Graphics-Based Mode

Saving

If you are viewing a text document, you can save that document directly to your local hard drive (drive C:). Click on Save As. The source document for the item you are viewing will be named in the "File Name" area. To save a document, click on the arrow next to the "Save File as Type" box at the bottom of the window. When the list of File Types appears, click on All Files. Then go back up to the "File Name" box, click inside it, delete the current filename and replace it with one of your own choosing, using the conventions of your computer (usually 8 characters, a period, and 3 characters, maximum). Then hit ENTER. Saving is only used for documents that you can already see on the screen, like text files.

Depending on your type of system, the file that is saved may have codes inserted into it that make it difficult to read. MHSC is currently working on an upgrade to PIE that will eliminate this problem. In them eantime, you can either delete all the codes manually, or print from PIE to a text (ASCII) file and they will be deleted.

Downloading

Downloading files is slightly different than saving. Saving a file is usually done to retain text files. Downloading is used for other types of files, like software programs, graphics and sound files, and is done by using a particular type of transfer protocol that saves the file as a binary file instead of a text file. These files must be read by a program that understands how to read the particular type of file (such as Harvard Graphics for a graphics file).

In Netscape, when you click on a graphics file or another type of downloadable file, Netscape automatically downloads the file to a directory on your PC. You can then read the file using some kind of software program that is compatible with the type of file, if you have such software on your system. If Netscape can find this software, it will run it for you and show you the image or play the sound that you downloaded. Since Netscape only recognizes certain types of software for this purpose, it is likely that you will have to operate the software and learn to use the file on your own.

Uploading

Uploading is the reverse of downloading. You start with a file on your computer, and you upload it to PIE using the transfer protocol mentioned above. Uploading will be used when agencies wish to update their data. You will format the data on your computer in such a way that PIE can use it, and then you will upload the data files onto PIE. See section Updating PIE Data, for more information.

To upload a file, the file must be in the Netscape directory. If the file is not already there, use the Windows File Manager or DOS to move it. (See your operating system manual for more information about moving files on your computer.)

You must use the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) in the PIE Folder to upload files while you are in graphics-based mode.

For more information about file formats and uploading your data to PIE, please consult with MHSC staff at 224-1336 or email us at admin@pie.mhsc.org.

Printing

To print files from PIE, use your computer's print screen function by simply pushing the PRINT SCREEN key or the SHIFT and PRINT SCREEN keys together.

To print graphics, you must save the graphic (a.k.a. downloading) and then open the saved graphic file in a grpahics program, and then print it using the graphics program. PIE does not include a graphics program that will print the graphic for you at this time.

Advanced printing capabilities on PIE are forthcoming. New versions of the PIE software will be outshortly and these will allow better printing methods.

Chapter Seven: Future Updates and Additions to PIE

Updating PIE Data

You will be able to update the data that your agency contributes to PIE by accessing PIE from your own computer and executing a procedure called uploading. Uploading uses File Transfer Protocol (FTP) software to load a file from your computer onto PIE. This function is not yet available, but it is planned to be made available for use in the first quarter of 1995. We will provide detailed instructions for users when this function is operating. In the meantime, please send your data by mail to the Metropolitan Human Services Commission, 360 South Third Street, Columbus, OH 43215 or call (614) 224-1336 for more information.

Manual Updates

MHSC will distribute manual updates as necessary. Dates will appear on all manuals, as will version numbers.

When such updates are distributed, we will coordinate their distribution with each agency's PIE representative. See the list of PIE Users on PIE for the name of your representative. Keeping your PIE notebook current will allow for the easiest, best and most effective use of PIE.

Index

a

  • Accidents, Hitting OS/2 Command Prompt in RLINK.
  • b

  • Benefits of PIE
  • Bookmarks in Text-Based Mode
  • c

  • Communications
  • Communications setup
  • Connecting to PIE
  • Connecting to PIE with Kermit
  • Connecting to PIE with RLINK
  • d

  • Databases on PIE
  • Dialing up PIE with RLINK
  • Discussion groups
  • DOS Kermit Installation
  • Downloading files from PIE
  • e

  • Electronic communications
  • Electronic mail
  • Email addresses
  • Email in Graphics Mode
  • Email, use of
  • Exiting Kermit
  • Exiting RLINK
  • f

  • Function of PIE
  • g

  • Getting Around on PIE
  • Getting into PIE, graphics-based
  • Getting into PIE, text-based
  • Getting Started with PIE
  • Goals, MHSC
  • Graphics capability
  • Graphics-based users, installation
  • h

  • Hardware Requirements
  • Human Services System, MHSC and
  • i

  • Information about PIE
  • Information, MHSC and
  • Installation of Kermit
  • Installation of PIE
  • Internet
  • k

  • Kermit
  • m

  • Manual Updates
  • Metropolitan Human Services Commission
  • Mission, MHSC
  • n

  • Networking
  • Newsgroups
  • o

  • Objectives, MHSC
  • OS/2 Command Prompt by accident
  • OS/2 Kermit Installation
  • OS/2 Users
  • p

  • People and Information Exchange
  • PIE Basics, text-based mode
  • PIE, benefits
  • PIE, Connecting
  • PIE, ease of access
  • PIE, features
  • PIE, function
  • PIE, installation
  • PIE, purpose
  • PIE, requirements
  • PIE, services
  • Printing files from PIE
  • r

  • Remote Link, setup
  • Requirements for PIE
  • RLINK installation
  • RLINK, connecting to PIE
  • RLINK, exiting
  • s

  • Saving files from PIE
  • Services Provided by PIE
  • Setting up Remote Link
  • Setup, communications
  • t

  • Text-based users, installation
  • u

  • Updating PIE data
  • Uploading files from PIE
  • w

  • Windows users